Travels
  • 1Gdansk sights
  • 2Gdansk sights
  • 2Gdansk sights
  • 2Gdansk sights

Great Mill

Is a shopping centre, but from 1350 to 1945, this mill was the largest working medieval mill in Europe. Inside excavations at the site. In its original form, the structure served as a flour mill, granary, and bakery, and the exterior still exhibits a working water wheel.

Old Town Hall

17th century interiors and a visit to the Baltic Sea Culture Centre. Both town halls were initiall built during the 14th century; despite its name, Old Town is no older than Main Town.


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St. Mary's Church

is the largest brick church in the world, and a climb to the roof offers unparalleled panoramas of Gdansk. Before you hike up the 400-plus stairs. Inside are wooden pieta, a 500-year-old astronomical clock, and a three-dimensional tryptic of the Last Judgement. largest brick church in the world. opens 6am-7.30pm Monday-Saturday, 8am-7pm on Sundays.


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Upland Gate

Called either the High Gate or the Upland Gate, this silvery-gray brick facade markes the beginning of Gdansk's so-called Royal Route, through which the king would pass on his visits to the city. This 16th century gate was originally a part of Gdansk's defensive system, now stands isolated.

Banks of the Motlawa River

charming seafood restaurants, amber and crystal vendors, shops carrying nautical wares, floating cafes


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Golden Gate

East. 1612. the Gate is decorated with figurines that symbol Peace, Freedom, Wealth, Fame, Piety, Fairness and Harmony.


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Crane

End of Long Street. medieval harbor built in 1444, Europe's oldest crane. If you walk under the crane, you can view its inner workings with its massive rope and gears.


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Artus Court

Dlugi Targ 43 At the entrance to Dlugi Targ stands a Gothic tenement from XIV c. This 10 m high residence is called The Artus Court. 18th-century town house decorated and furnished in period style. It opens 10am-3pm Tuesday, 10am-4pm Wednesday-Saturday, 11am-4pm on Sundays; admission costs PLN10 (£2.30); free on Tuesdays.


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Długa St & Długi Targ St

The Długa and Długi Targ Streets which are also known as Trakt Królewski (the Royal Route) from Middle Ages, but most of the buildings were erected in modern times. Tenement houses on Długa Street are typical Gdańsk houses with narrow facades topped with gables or attics, richly decorated with coats of arms, silhouettes of ancient heroes.


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Neptune Fountain

in front of the Artus Court since 1633 is a symbol of Gdańsk. built by Mayor of Gdańsk, Bartłomiej Schachmann. The model was prepared by Peter Husen and Johann Rogge, and it was cast in 1615 in Augsburg. legends say it was Neptune helped to create Gdańsk liqueur called Goldwasser. He got angry at people throwing golden coins into the fountain and hit the water with his trident so hard that the gold fell to pieces, forming small golden flakes which now shine in the tasty herbal liqueur.


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The Golden House

1609 by the Jan Speyman, the Mayor of the city and at the same time a wealthy merchant and an open-minded patron of the arts, and his wife, Judyta. Legend goes the corridors are visited by a ghost of the Judyta Speymann whispering “Act justly, fear no one”.

St. Mary's Street

from the St Mary's church to the Long Embankment with the Medieval St Mary's Gate. Historic Gdansk urban planning belonged to affluent merchants and goldsmiths. The picturesque scenery of the place has always inspired writers and painters. It has also used as the scene of films.


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The Royal Chapel

King Jan III Sobieski to serve as a temporary place of worship for the Catholics of St Mary's parish church, which at that time was held by Protestants. It is a masterpiece created by Barthel Ranisch, erected between 1678-1681, according to the design of the royal architect, Tylman of Gameren.


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