Travels
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1. Heraklion

This is a very busy city in crete and hard to find a good car park as there are many one way streets. We got slightly lost but it's ok as people here aren't as impatient as they are in London! Everyone is friendly and there are loads of shops and high streets to shop around in. There is a lovely line of resturants by the port and the castle.


2. Agios Nikolaos

This town is a very beautiful fishermans port. There are lots of sailing boats docked by the pebbled beach. Walk around the side roads and shop around in the boutiques for souveniers. There are great views of the sun set by the water and its quiet easy to find a car park in the town centre.


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3. Chania

Some notable archaeological evidence for the existence of this Minoan city below some parts of today's Chania was found by excavations. It is a small town by the sea. Nice to hang around for maybe half a day but there isn't much going on in this lazy town. There are lots of nice cafe's to have lunch around the port and many handy crafts you can purchase.

4. Malia

It's full of Chavs and lots of clubs if that's your kind of thing. The bus service is few and far between and costs around £7 for a round trip so you're better off hiring a car and driving around the island. The beach is nice though and you can get some really cheap hotels away from all the noise and clubs. We stayed in Agion Sky which I would recommend. It has its own mini swimming pool and it's very clean and convenient.

5. Rethymno

This was my favorite town out of all the ones visited in crete, it has a good mixture of everything and its breathtaking to look at from the port. There is a huge market by the port and large cruise ships that dock. Up in the hills there is an old fortress and mosque. There are many market streets in town


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6. Samaria National Park

Samaria Gorge is an excurssion you can take from most towns in crete. It starts painfully early. You have to wait in the pitch darkness on a specified street in your local town for the bus to pick you up and by the time you arrive at samaria the sun will have risen.

It's well worth a visit but be prepared to walk for around 5 hours straight (down hill all the way). The good thing about it is you don't have to keep up with the rest of the group as it's very well sign posted so you can't really get lost, so take your time and enjoy the scenary! There is only place along the way where your group will congragate for a pit stop to have lunch and you'll need to bring your own pack lunch). This is the only place you can go to the toilet which is a hole in the ground and has no bog roll so be prepared and bring wet wipes!

The gorge is in southwest crete in the regional unit of Chania. It was created by a small river running between the White Mountains (Lefká Óri) and Mt. Volakias.

The walk through Samaria National Park is 13 km long, but you have to walk another three km to Agia Roumeli from the park exit, making the hike 16 km. The most famous part of the gorge is the stretch known as the Iron Gates, where the sides of the gorge close in to a width of only four meters and soar up to a height of 1,100m (3,610feet). The gorge became a national park in 1962, particularly as a refuge for the rare kri-kri (Cretan goat), which is largely restricted to the park and an island just off the shore of Agia Marina.


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7. Lassithi Plateau

Lasithi Plateau, famous for its windmills. Vai is well-known for its datepalm forest. It is a flat region surrounded by mountains, great views. There is also Diktaion Antron cave where Zeus was born. Lassithi plateau is often described as the plateau with 10000 windmills


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8. Knosos

The palace complex is the largest Bronze Age archaeological site on crete. It was undoubtedly the ceremonial and political centre of the Minoan civilization and culture.

Many of the ruins were inscribed with Knosion or Knos on the obverse and an image of a Minotaur or Labyrinth on the reverse, both symbols deriving from the myth of King Minos, supposed to have reigned from Knossos.


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